Rooster

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Rooster – Symbolism, Meaning and Superstitions

Rooster SuperstitionNo home that wants to enhance good luck is complete without a rooster.

The rooster has strong symbolism and is deeply connected to prosperity.  For centuries this animal has been associated with good fortune.

This bird is connected to the sun and dawn. It is also a symbol of courage, pride and domination.

In ancient times in Europe people believed the crowing of the rooster warded off all the evil spirits that lurked about during the night.

Display at Least One Rooster in Your Kitchen

An old superstition states that if a rooster comes into your kitchen it is very good fortune. It foretells wealth and prosperity will enter the household.

Not very many people today would dream of letting a live rooster peck away in the kitchen. None the less, the superstition is still very much alive today. All sorts of stuff for the kitchen are sold with rooster illustrations or pictures on them.

Rooster symbols are sold in the thousands. Having one or more images of roosters in your kitchen is an obvious good luck symbol.

If you are looking to improve your finances why not make sure you have at least one “rooster” in your kitchen. It certainly will help remind you of your goals and dreams of having increasing amounts of cash coming your way.

The Legend of the Rooster of Barcelos

Barcelos RoosterBarcelos is an old town in Northern Portugal with around 120 000 inhabitants. An old legend featuring a rooster originates from this town. It has made a huge impact on not only the town but on the whole country of Portugal.

The Rooster of Barcelos has become somewhat a national symbol of Portugal.

It is considered extremely auspicious and is a favorite good luck symbol in Portugal.

There are many different versions of the legend. Here is one of them.

The Legend

A pilgrim was travelling on his way toward his destination of Santiago de Compostela in Spain. This is where many believe the tomb of the apostle Saint James the Great is to be found.

On his journey he decided to stop for a rest in the town of Barcelos. Shortly after the pilgrim arrived an unknown thief robbed a dominant landowner.  Valuable silver was missing from the wealthy landowner of Barcelos.  The landowner was furious.

The people of Barcelos were getting nervous. They knew it was of utmost urgency to find the guilty person. Rumors that the stranger in town must be guilty of this crime soon reached the ears of the landowner.

The poor pilgrim was arrested and put to trial. Naturally he pleaded not guilty.  His plea was not taken into account. The authorities informed the pilgrim that the local judge had ordered that he be hanged for his crime.

The pilgrim was devastated, after all he was innocent. He asked to be granted one final wish before they hanged him. He wanted to meet the judge in person. His request was granted.

The authorities escorted him to the judge’s home. The pilgrim pleaded with the judge proclaiming he was innocent. The judge was engaged in a dinner party and was in no mood to listen to the stranger begging for his life. 

The pilgrim then looked at the roasted rooster on the plate in front of the judge and proclaimed: “It is as certain that I am innocent as it is certain that this rooster will crow when they hang me.”

The judge lost his appetite for the rooster and ordered the pilgrim to be taken away.

Just as the pilgrim was being hanged at the gallows, the rooster on the judge’s table got up and crowed. The judge realized what a frightful mistake he had made and rushed to the gallows.

Rooster cross PortugalFortunately the pilgrim was still alive, probably because the knot on the rope was poorly made. He was cut down and sent on his way in peace.

Sometime later the pilgrim returned to Barcelos and had a monument sculptured to Calvary of the Lord of the Rooster in honor of the Virgin Mary and of Saint James.

In other more plausible versions of the legend, the rooster is alive. In all versions a it crows to proclaim the innocence of the pilgrim.

Today sculptures of roosters are sold in the millions. They are colorful and beautifully painted. The designs may vary, but all are quite lovely. These sculptures are considered a symbol of good fortune and faith.

The Rooster and Feng Shui

Feng Shui has remedies for most of life’s situations. A statue of a rooster comes in handy especially if you share an office with others. Rumors and gossip are sad to say quite common in work places.

If your desk is in a tight spot you need a rooster guarding your desk. It could be that you have people working behind your back or that your desk has been squeezed into a corner.

Placing a statue of a rooster on your desk will protect you from gossip according to Feng Shui. It does not have to be large or tacky looking.

There are some really nice ones made of brass. Whatever you like is fine. Hopefully it should give you peace of mind and not worry about what other ill-mannered and jealous people are saying.

Year of the Rooster

In the Chinese zodiac the year of the rooster arrives every twelfth year.  The rooster is a yin sign.

Generally speaking a person born in this year is a good organizer; he or she may be eccentric and entertaining. Other traits of people born in this year are that they are honest and clever. They are often found to be good looking. They are independent, but may also be rather impatient.

Of course the element of the year must be taken into consideration. A personal Chinese horoscope is just as complex as that of Western astrology.

January 26, 1933 through February 13, 1934 (Water)

 February 13, 1945 through February 1, 1946 (Wood)

January 31, 1957 through February 17, 1958 (Fire)

February 17, 1969 through February 5, 1970 (Earth)

February 5, 1981 through – January 24, 1982 (Metal)

 January 23, 1993 through February 9, 1994 (Water)

February 9, 2005 through – January 28, 2006 (Wood)

January 28, 2017 through February 15, 2018 (Fire)

February 13, 2029 through February 2, 2030 (Earth)

February 1, 2041 through – January 21, 2042 (Metal)

The Rooster in Christian Symbolism

Rooster Church steeple
Laksevåg Church Bergen, Norway

According to legend the rooster was the first animal to proclaim the birth of Jesus.

The rooster has a major role in the Bible referring to Peter’s denials of Christ. Peter was warned by Jesus that he would betray him three times before the cock crows.

This story is found in Matthew 26:33-35, 69-75, Mark 14:30-31, 66-72, Luke 22:34, 56-62, John 13:36-37, 18:25-27. The cock is in this case regarded as a warning against arrogance.


Pope Gregory I (540 – 604) proclaimed that the rooster should be regarded as a symbol of Christianity and the emblem of Saint Peter.

Some churches around the world have a rooster as a weathervane on the church steeple instead of the traditional cross.

Many Christians regarded the rooster as a symbol of Christ, the bringer of a new dawn and light.

The rooster also served as a reminder for the parishioners to gather at the church for prayer.

Mercury in Roman Mythology

Mercury Hendrick GoltziusMercury was the god of travelers, business transactions and financial abundance.

He was the god of communication and of good luck. Much to our dismay, he was also god of thieves.

Mercury is easy to recognize by the winged hat and winged shoes which he often wore.

The rooster was associated with Mercury. It was one of his sacred animals.

Mercury was the son of Maia and Jupiter.

In Greek mythology his equivalent is Hermes. Hermes is the son of Maia and Zeus.